Ingredients

ingredients

We source the finest
natural and organic ingredients
and
bottle our products locally.

mazy
pomegranate

pomegranate

A berry from a deciduous shrub, pomegranates are considered one of the healthiest fruits on earth. Pomegranate juice contains more than 100 phytochemicals.

Containing punicalagins, extremely potent antioxidants, so powerful that pomegranate juice has been found to have three times the antioxidant activity of red wines and green teas. Pomegranates also have potent anti-inflammatory properties.

Pomegranate gives Mazy its tannic qualities and bold, rich profile.

teas

teas

Black tea leaves are fermented before the final heating process and contain alkylamine antigens that help boost immune response. Black tea contains polyphenols, which are also antioxidants that help block DNA damage. Also on our list of leaves, the culinary bay leaf. Delicately fragrant and lightly bitter, bay leaf offers antimicrobial and antioxidant benefits.

Black tea adds tannins and earthiness to Mazy's structure. Bay leaf gives Mazy a smooth herbal characteristic.

gentiana

gentiana

Gentiana is a genus of flowering plants occurring in the alpine habitats in temperate regions of Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Gentian root is an intensely bitter root that has been utilized in traditional European herbalism for centuries, typically used in digestive tonics. It is a chief ingredient in vermouth as well as many formulations of bitters.

Gentiana contributes a pleasant bitter note that elevates Mazy's layered experience.

anise

anise

Anise is a sweet and aromatic, herbaceous plant with yellow or white flowers. The seeds are used whole or ground to make teas, candy confections such as Australian humbugs, and treats such as the Mexican champurrado. Anise has been used in traditional medicine and was cited by Pliny the Elder for its effects on calming the stomach, freshening breath, and as a remedy for asp bites. Anise is used as a flavoring element in many liquors in Europe and Asia, especially Greek ouzo, French absinthe, and Italian sambucca.

Anise provides Mazy with a mellowing spice layer that soothes the palate against the mild heat of this complex drink.

tart cherry

tart cherry

The fruit of the dwarf cherry tree is more acidic than its sweet cousin. Known to the Greeks as early as 300 B.C., these cherries were extremely popular with Persians and Romans. They are grown widely today because tart cherries are used in many popular desserts, to make syrups, and to flavor many liquers and beers such as Belgian lambics. The tart cherry is rich in nutrients and may increase strength and reduce muscle soreness. It was historically used as a treatment for arthritis and gout.

Tart cherry imparts Mazy with a tangy fruitiness that balances its tannic and peppery characteristics.

absence
wormwood

wormwood

Artemisia absinthium, as its name suggests, is a major ingredient of the liquor Absinthe and is widely considered the most bitter of the herbs. Once outlawed in the U.S., the wormwood in Absinthe is the intoxicating source of the jade-green color in the drink; a drink that many creative geniuses have enjoyed (Hemingway, Wilde, Van Gogh, etc). European folklore suggests that it was used in formulating love potions and for making a remedy for poisons. It is often used in appertivos and digestivos (liquors that stimulate appetite and digestion). Liquors containing wormwood, such as the polarizing Malort, have recently gained cult-status.

We used wormwood in Absence for its punchy aroma and punchier bitterness.

angelica

angelica

Also known as “the root of the holy ghost,” angelica has been used traditionally as an herbal remedy. The flowers and leaves create medicinal teas, tinctures, and elixirs that aid in digestion and soothe stress and anxiety. The leaves of the plant are often candied decorative elements for culinary dishes and the root is used in flavoring liquors such as gin and genever.

We used angelica root in Absence to temper your mood and to temper the bitter elements in the cocktail with a sweet, woody compliment.

bergamot

bergamot

Citrus bergamia, the bergamot orange, is a highly-prized and scarce citrus fruit grown mainly in Calabria, Italy. Its uniquely spicy-citrusy character makes it desirable for perfumes, and to flavor and aromatize foods and drinks. Earl Grey and Rooibos teas and Turkish Delight obtain their unique qualities from this fruit, also known as the "lord's pear."

Bergamot gives Absence a profoundly floral citrus aroma.

coriander

coriander

Named after the daughter of the king of ancient Crete, coriander is an herbaceous plant whose leaves are known as cilantro. Coriander was one of the first herbs grown by the American colonists of Massachusetts, and 17th century Frenchmen used distilled coriander seed to make a type of liquor. The leaves and roots are used in cooking to brighten dishes, while the seeds add a sweet aromatic taste with a touch of citrus.

Coriander supplies Absence with a complex earthy, citrus zest.

juniper

juniper

Juniper berries, actually a conifer cone, are commonly distilled for their oil and used historically to flavor gin. The flavor profile is dominated by piney, resinous pinene, along with citrus notes. Medicinal use in almost all cultures has been as a diuretic.

The juniper in Absence adds a lightly piney aroma and a slightly piney flavor.

peppermint

peppermint

A hybrid of watermint and spearmint, peppermint is also known as Mentha balsamea. Peppermint has a particularly high menthol content and has many phytochemicals such as terpenes, terpenoids, and flavonoids. Mint plants are perennials recognized as being among the oldest herbs used for both culinary and medicinal purposes. Peppermint has traditionally been used as a palliative for gastric aliments.

Just a hint of peppermint enlivens and prolongs the flavor and aroma of Absence.

fennel

fennel

Fennel is a member of the Apiaceae family, which contains mostly aromatic flowering plants. The Greek name for fennel is marathon, named for the famous battle that took place on a fennel-covered plain. Used in the pagan Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm, fennel was placed on wounds as a healing salve and was administered along with a healing incantation. The stalks have an herbaceous flavor with undertones of mint and licorice.

Fennel was used in Absence to add a light licorice note without going to anise candy.

hops

hops

Hops are the flowers (also known as cones) that come from a large, perennial vine Humulus lupulus. Hops can be used fresh or dried, and the varietals lends beer distinctive flavors and bittering. Hops have been used medicinally for over a millennium as a form of antibiotic, as a sedative and sleep aid, to relieve pain, and to improve digestion. Hops belong to the same family of herbs as marijuana containing same or similar terpenes and flavonoids.

As a brewer, one of our founders couldn’t resist adding his beloved hops. In Absence, the use of Centennial hop oil brings a fresh pine and citrus aroma and suspended bitterness.

sweet basil

sweet basil

The French sometimes call basil “l’herb royale” for its versatility and its former rarity. Sweet basil or Genovese basil is the varietal most commonly used in cuisine. Basil is used in Ayurveda and traditional Chinese medicines and is thought to have therapeutic properties. Interestingly, the plant was given as a symbol of love in Portugal but represented hatred in ancient Greece. In parts of Europe, basil is placed in the hands of the dead to ensure a safe passage to heaven.

Basil imparts Absence with a fresh, peppery clove compliment to the fennel.

redessence
rose

rose

For hundreds of years, the rose has been revered for its beauty, fragrance, and invocations of the heart. There are over 300 species and tens of thousands of cultivars of rose. Roses are used ornamentally all over the world. Rose hips (the fruit of the plant) and rose petals have been used to flavor baked goods, sweets, and sauces.

The rose in Redessence imparts a captivating aroma.

lavender

lavender

A member of the mint family Lamiaceae, lavender is a culinary herb that can be used to amplify both sweet and savory flavors in dishes. The flowers yield abundant nectar, from which bees make a high-quality honey. As an aromatic, it has a sweet fragrance with citrus notes. The buds are a beautiful shade of purple, some may describe as, well, lavender.

Lavender adds a floral, lightly lemony, and subtly sweet element to Redessence.

hibiscus

hibiscus

Hibiscus is a genus of plant in the mallow family, highly desirable for their spectacular display of brightly colored flowers. Teas and drinks made from the hibiscus flower are known for their bright red or pink color, tart flavor, and high vitamin C content. Culinarily, some species’ edible flowers are used as garnishes, as vegetables, and as a souring ingredient for savory dishes.

We used hibiscus for its floral tartness to complement the fruity tartness of rhubarb in Redessence.

rhubarb

rhubarb

Though fruity in flavor, rhubarb is a vegetable in the Rheum genus and unlike many plants that look like it, the leaves are inedible. The stalks, known as petioles, have been used in pies and other desserts for many decades due to its ease of cultivation and off-peak harvest seasonality. Prior to the 18th century, rhubarb was fairly rare, and was traded on the “silk road” at which time it was more costly than opium and saffron. It has been used for thousands of years in Chinese medicine.

Rhubarb imparts Redessence with its distinctive fruity tartness and gorgeous color.

elderflowers

elderflowers

The elderflower (Sambucus plant) bears large clusters of small white flowers in late spring that develop into black, blue, or red berries. Elderberries can be made into wine, and the flowers take center stage in many liqueurs including the floral spirit St. Germaine. The berries and flowers have been used in traditional medicines to provide relief from minor ailments such as colds and flu.

Elderflower gives Redessence some of its sweet floral character and adds a hint of perfumey complexity to the flavor.

ginger

ginger

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant whose root is used as the fragrant and pungent spice. The oldest records show ginger being cultivated and exported from southeast Asia in the 1st century AD, and it was so highly revered that it was used to bless ships before voyages. High in antioxidants and anti-inflammatories, ginger has been utilized in Ayurvedic medicine for hundreds of years to help with nausea and joint pain.

Ginger provides Redessence with a punch of warming spice and a kick of tangy flavor.